In partnership with NY Writers Coalition and MoCADA, we will be presenting selected readings from our current issue on July 24th. You won’t want to miss this evening with readers, writers, and storytellers: RSVP now

About this issue: Guest edited by poet Arisa WhiteNotes on Anger is a phenomenal series that explores the ways in which black women have, as Audre Lorde notes, traveled through the dominions of anger. This fantastic series features writers: Monica A. Hand, Idrissa Louise, adrienne maree brown, Joshunda Sanders, Metta Sáma, Tara Betts, Angelique V. Nixon and Mecca Jamilah Sullivan.

Cover art by: Tiffany Latrice

art21:

"I don’t think that my work is actually effectively dealing with history. I think of my work as subsumed by history or consumed by history." —Kara Walker

New episode from Art21’s Exclusive series: An in-depth look at the creation of Kara Walker’s monumental public project for Creative Time, A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby (2014), at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn, NY.

WATCH: Kara Walker: “A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby”

IMAGES: Production stills from the Art21 Exclusive episode, Kara Walker: “A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby”. © Art21, Inc. 2014.

(via lovelala)

sincecombahee:

Black Folk Don’t: Do Feminism

May 11, 2014 by 

Published on Dec 23, 2013: There have been many conversations about the definition of feminism and who falls neatly (or not so neatly) within that definition. From Shirley Chisholm to Audre Lorde, this episode gets into it all so watch and let us know what you think. Tune in to new episodes every Monday, and share your thoughts with @blackfolkdont on Twitter. A special presentation of BlackPublicMedia.org, directed by Angela Tucker, and supported by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Source: everyday feminism

(via elixherfix)

ethiopienne:

Early Octavia Butler stories coming out in June

(ASSOCIATED PRESS) A pair of recently discovered early stories by prize-winning science fiction author Octavia Butler will be coming out as an e-book in June.

Open Road Integrated Media, a digital publisher, announced Tuesday that “A Necessary Being” and “Childfinder” will be compiled in a single volume titled “Unexpected Stories” and will be released June 24. Walter Mosley, the best-selling crime writer, has contributed an introduction.
“’Unexpected Stories’ reveals the themes that would become Butler’s lexicon: the complicating mysteries we assign to power, race, and gender,” Mosley writes. “Reading these tales is like looking at a photograph of a child who you only knew as an adult. In her eyes you can see the woman that you came to know much later; a face, not yet fully formed, that contains the promise of something that is now a part of you; the welcomed surprise of recognition in innocent eyes.”
Butler, who died in 2006 at age 58, was one of the first black science fiction writers to receive mainstream attention and was known for such books as “Bloodchild and Other Stories” and the novel “Parable of the Sower.” She was inducted, posthumously, into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2010.
Butler’s literary agent, Merrilee Heifetz, found the stories, written in the early 1970s, among the author’s papers at the Huntington Library in San Marino, Calif. According to Open Road, “A Necessary Being” tells of how the leaders of two ancient tribes “must broker a delicate peace to ensure that their peoples are to survive.” In “Childfinder,” a young woman “locates children with budding psionic powers and teaches them to protect themselves from society.”

ethiopienne:

Early Octavia Butler stories coming out in June

(ASSOCIATED PRESS) A pair of recently discovered early stories by prize-winning science fiction author Octavia Butler will be coming out as an e-book in June.

Open Road Integrated Media, a digital publisher, announced Tuesday that “A Necessary Being” and “Childfinder” will be compiled in a single volume titled “Unexpected Stories” and will be released June 24. Walter Mosley, the best-selling crime writer, has contributed an introduction.

“’Unexpected Stories’ reveals the themes that would become Butler’s lexicon: the complicating mysteries we assign to power, race, and gender,” Mosley writes. “Reading these tales is like looking at a photograph of a child who you only knew as an adult. In her eyes you can see the woman that you came to know much later; a face, not yet fully formed, that contains the promise of something that is now a part of you; the welcomed surprise of recognition in innocent eyes.”

Butler, who died in 2006 at age 58, was one of the first black science fiction writers to receive mainstream attention and was known for such books as “Bloodchild and Other Stories” and the novel “Parable of the Sower.” She was inducted, posthumously, into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2010.

Butler’s literary agent, Merrilee Heifetz, found the stories, written in the early 1970s, among the author’s papers at the Huntington Library in San Marino, Calif. According to Open Road, “A Necessary Being” tells of how the leaders of two ancient tribes “must broker a delicate peace to ensure that their peoples are to survive.” In “Childfinder,” a young woman “locates children with budding psionic powers and teaches them to protect themselves from society.”

And I cried. For myself. For this woman talkin’ about love. For all the women who have ever stretched their bodies out anticipating civilization and finding ruins.  Sonia Sanchez, Homegirls and Handgrenades
(via blackandlatina)

(via blackandlatina)

eeloom:

NoViolet Bulawayo Book Signing: “We Need New Names”

NoViolet Bulawayo is a Zimbabwean Caine award winning novelist, whose first book “We Need New Names” was launched in May 2013. She is currently a Stegner Fellow at Stanford University. Her short story “Hitting Budapest” won her the 2011 Caine Award For African Writing.

WATCH HERE…

March is for the womens…and so is this mix I did in collaboration with Zora Online Magazine. Had a great time putting this together.

Make sure to check out Zora’s website and follow em on the twitter thing:

Love ya’ll

-P.

Artwork By: @sansanzabeth



Like,
follow, or Instagram Run P.


1. Citizen Weekend Intro - Lupita Nyong’o
2. Samaritan - Nonamegypsy
3. How to Satisfy your Lover (Prod. J57) - Denitia & Sene
4. Cell - Falcons
5. Real Love (SHASH’U Remix) - Mary J. Blige
6. Shadow of The Beast - Perseus
7. Creep Astronomar Moombahton Remix - TLC
8. Trip.Fall - Denitia & Sene
9. Alicia - Darius & Crayon
10. Be Your Girl (Kaytranada Edition) - Teedra Moses
11. L.M.O. (Giant Step Mix) - Muhsinah
12. Locked in Closets - Solange Knowles
13. White Noise (Feat. Aluna George) - Disclosure
14. Don’t Wait (Kingdom Remix) - Mapei
15. That Thing (Gold Boy Bootleg) - Lauryn Hill
16. You Ain’t Got It (Funk That) - Nina Sky
17. Sunshine (Cristian Dinamarca Remix) - Rye Rye & M.I.A.
18. You Know You Like It (Wilfred Giroux Remix) - Aluna George
19. Jerk Ribs (Will Saul & Komon Remix) - Kelis
20. Homee (Old Money Remix) - Blind Benny
21. Tell Me (George FitzGerald Remix) - Groove Theory
22. Dignidad - Celia Cruz
23. Enemy (Prod. Nguzunguzu) - Kelela
24. Updowndownup (Prod. Machinedrum) - Janet Jackson
25. Break You Down (Feat. Sanna) - Loz Contreras
26. Sourire - Les Nubians
27. 5 (Feat. Jaden Smith) - Willow Smith
28. At Night - Ele
29. Actually No - Angela Davis
30. Boom Skit - M.I.A.

gradientlair:

Inspired by the truth and power of #ITooAmHarvard, people of colour who are students at University of Oxford in the U.K. created #ITooAmOxford to speak of their experiences with racism on campus. The photographs are diverse (there’s more on their site) and here I included some of the ones of Black women/women of African descent (my apologies if I misread any genders) as I did when I posted my now viral post on I Too Am Harvard because again it reveals the racist assumptions about both their intelligence and appearance, something I dealt with as a Black woman when I was younger and in undergrad/grad. I also noticed the sense of “place” and nationality that impacts the stereotypes that they face. 

This is a point for the lies about racism being uniquely American to stop. Now. Today. I am tired of weekly emails from Whites ahistorically announcing how racism does not exist in the U.K. It is not their place to make that determination anyway; only Black and other people of colour can. The person who experiences the oppression, not the oppressor, the oppressed, not the privileged, speak truth to the experiences.

These students are speaking their truths. Do not ignore them. Their lives matter. They deserve better than the stress and even physical/mental health issues that dealing with racism can cause. Stereotype threat is real and impacts academic performance and health. 

I wish these students the best. Much love. 

(via newmodelminority)